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People Places and Things

Hallelujah

George Frederic Handel, like many composers of his time, traveled and lived in a number of European countries and cities in Germany and Italy before finally settling in London, England. As a German-born expatriate, Handel was a favorite with the British royalty and nobility, composing many pieces of music by commission. His body of work included operas, oratorios, chamber music, organ pieces but at this time of the year, his best known work is the oratorio

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Living the Life

Thanksgiving

Every culture celebrates special occasions and holidays and whether secular or religious, these celebrations come with their own set of rituals and traditions. In the United States, Thanksgiving is arguably the biggest holiday and associated with many rites that can surprise and give expats

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Living the Life

Culture of One

Culture can be thought of as a set of behaviors or beliefs distinct to a group, and so trick or treating on All Hallows’ Eve, burning effigies for Guy Fawkes’ Day, Black Friday and/or Boxing Day shopping. Cuisine is definitely cultural as cooking styles and ingredient staples differ and religion or traditions have shaped celebrations and holidays all over the world. But where do these cultural behaviors come from? how do they get so ingrained that they become the expected and the normal?

Some cultural differences can be attributed to location and/or isolation. People living near the coasts are more likely

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People Places and Things

Say What?

The 1963 movie adaptation of the 1950 book The Great Escape was based on the true story of POWs in World War II. 76 POWs escaped from the high-security prison Stalag Luft III in German-occupied Poland through an underground tunnel dug by the prisoners. In the movie, despite not being able to speak German or Polish, two of the characters were one bus ride away from freedom when they were caught by a suspicious German officer. He said “good luck” in English and despite the circumstances, the Scottish escapee replied

Read more: Say What?

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